Reverse Sit Up

REVERSE SIT UP

Muscles used

reverse sit up

Performing a reverse sit up places additional emphasis on your lower abdominals for a greater length of time during the exercise.  For that reason, these are ideal for building your lower abs.

How to perform reverse sit ups

Start by sitting up on the floor with knees slightly bent and the soles of your feet firmly on the ground. 

Next, slowly lower yourself backwards, keeping everything still except the hinge in your hips as you slowly bring the back of your shoulders towards the floor. 

Keep your core tight so that you can control the movement and avoid falling back to quickly.  A reverse sit up is all about control!

Once your back is on the floor, finish the exercise by sitting straight back up and then slowly lower yourself back down again in one smooth and controlled movement. 

Go for reps.

Reverse sit up: Common mistakes to avoid

Common mistakes are moving too quickly on the way down, you should take your time and really force your lower abs to remain under tension for as long as possible during your reverse sit up.  

And last but not least, you should also keep the muscle you are working (abs in this instance), in mind throughout the exercise.  Mind muscle connection will, without a doubt, help you to ensure targeted end results.

Reps and sets

As with all exercises, your reverse sit ups should be worked into your overall bigger picture.  How many reps and sets you perform with each exercise depends entirely on where you are physically and your desired outcomes.

Beginners should keep it simple; 3-4 sets of 8-12 reps is an ideal starting point.  Don’t overcomplicate things early on, worry about laying a solid foundation and the rest will come with experience.

More advanced lifters should consider their current strength and goals.

Beyond reverse sit ups...

Check out more abs & core exercises and of course, be sure to track your lifts.

More abs & core exercises coming soon...

Just so you know, this list of abs & core exercises is a work in progress and is by no means extensive.  We will continue to grow this entire database for you over time, so be sure to check back for updates.  Alternatively, you can join our mailing list below and you’ll be the first to know about all new content we produce.

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